EXCLUSIVE: Business Secretary Vince Cable breaks silence on Daily Telegraph's undercover sting and speaks of 'great damage' caused

Your Local Guardian: Speaking out: Business Secretary Vince Cable said the Telegraph sting had caused 'great damage' to relations between MPs and their constituents Speaking out: Business Secretary Vince Cable said the Telegraph sting had caused 'great damage' to relations between MPs and their constituents

Vince Cable today broke his silence to speak of how a sting by undercover reporters had caused “great damage” to the confidential relationship between MPs and constituents.

The Business Secretary said the Daily Telegraph's tactics had "completely undermined" the work of local MPs and he would need to be “more guarded” in the future.

In an exclusive interview with the Richmond and Twickenham Times, he said he was concerned his constituents could be "inhibited or worried" about visiting him at his weekly surgeries.

But the MP insisted he would not quit and remained committed to his work in Twickenham.

It was revealed on on Monday how he told two Telegraph reporters - posing as concerned mothers from his constituency - that he could bring down the Government if he was “pushed too far” by the Conservatives.

In comments held back by the Telegraph but later leaked to the BBC, he “declared war” on media mogul Rupert Murdoch.

Dr Cable said today: “I feel quite angry and strongly about this, I’ve had constituency surgeries now for 13 years every week, that’s well over 600.

“Thousands and thousands of constituents have been to see me, often on very difficult and highly confidential issues which have been respected by me and by them.

“Then somebody who isn’t a constituent falsifies their name and address and comes in with a hidden microphone - it completely undermines the whole basis on which you operate as a local MP.

“All my colleagues, of all parties, feel very strongly that some great damage has been done by this.”

The Business Secretary has been stripped of his role in deciding News Corporation's proposed takeover of BSkyB, but will keep his cabinet job.

He said today he wanted to speak to the Richmond and Twickenham Times first to reassure his constituents.

Dr Cable said: “I’m very committed to my constituency work, it’s obviously difficult when you’re in the cabinet, but I will continue in the new year and I hope people will not feel they are inhibited or worried about coming to see me.

“I will continue to make myself available and continue to be a local MP to the best of my ability.”

He ruled out taking legal action against the Telegraph, and added: “Sometimes you have to try to give people frank comments and advice, and in this particular case I did preface what I was saying by saying if they want to have a conversation about a political matter as well as a personal matter it is confidential, and you do expect people to behave in a trustworthy way, which these people from the Daily Telegraph didn’t.

“Obviously one will have to be more guarded, but the problem is you need to give people an honest answer when they ask a question. Again it diminishes our role.

“It’s unfortunate, I will just have to find a way to deal with this which enables me to perform my local role properly.”

He said he remained “committed” to working within the coalition Government, but declined to comment further on his cabinet role.

He is due to go on holiday in the new year, but will continue his constituency surgeries in the first week of January.

Read the full digital edition of this week's Richmond and Twickenham Times - which will only be available online as an e-edition - right here on Christmas Eve.

Comments (16)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

2:56pm Thu 23 Dec 10

Clermont-Ferrand says...

There's no fool like an old fool and that's what Vince is. He's been found out to be living a lie - praising the coalition in public and slagging off the tories in private. This doesn't come as a surprise after he pledged to oppose any increase in tuition fees before introducing legislation to triple them. He should have been sacked.
There's no fool like an old fool and that's what Vince is. He's been found out to be living a lie - praising the coalition in public and slagging off the tories in private. This doesn't come as a surprise after he pledged to oppose any increase in tuition fees before introducing legislation to triple them. He should have been sacked. Clermont-Ferrand
  • Score: 0

3:16pm Thu 23 Dec 10

nicklee says...

It's very simple. St Vince, patron saint to the befuddled, was planning to violate the human rights act.

In particular article 6.

In the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.

This also applies to companies.

Vince Cable was responsible for competition law in media, had prejudge the case and was not impartial. He had made no move to recluse himself either from the judgement.

He's not a fit and proper person to hold office when he was the one setting out deliberately to commit a breach of the human rights act.

That act is designed to protect the citizen from the state, and he clearly thinks its immaterial when he sees fit.
It's very simple. St Vince, patron saint to the befuddled, was planning to violate the human rights act. In particular article 6. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law. This also applies to companies. Vince Cable was responsible for competition law in media, had prejudge the case and was not impartial. He had made no move to recluse himself either from the judgement. He's not a fit and proper person to hold office when he was the one setting out deliberately to commit a breach of the human rights act. That act is designed to protect the citizen from the state, and he clearly thinks its immaterial when he sees fit. nicklee
  • Score: 0

3:18pm Thu 23 Dec 10

tradders says...

Who needs Wikileaks when we have dick heads like you Vincent?
Who needs Wikileaks when we have dick heads like you Vincent? tradders
  • Score: 0

3:26pm Thu 23 Dec 10

CroydonGeorge says...

Obviously Mr. Cable is right about the all-consuming Murdoch corporation; we do NOT want such monster outfits getting even bigger! The Telegraph stinkers, err I mean stingers are just despicable excuses for journalists. Who wants such under-handed prats trying to do their dirty tricks like this.
Gutter press, that's the term for them.
Obviously Mr. Cable is right about the all-consuming Murdoch corporation; we do NOT want such monster outfits getting even bigger! The Telegraph stinkers, err I mean stingers are just despicable excuses for journalists. Who wants such under-handed prats trying to do their dirty tricks like this. Gutter press, that's the term for them. CroydonGeorge
  • Score: 0

3:52pm Thu 23 Dec 10

alex twickenham says...

What utter tosh from Vince.
As a local resident, I know something about this man who clearly got carried away by his own sense of self importance or vanity - probably both. After so many years in opposition, I suspect that his first sniff of power has gone to his head and he couldn't resist showing off to a pair of apparently impressionable young ladies. More fool him, hubris has brought down far better men than he. As a constituency MP, many of us feel that he did little or nothing to support our community against the LibDem Council who were determined to force through extremely unpopular policies - the Riverside sell-off and the "linked sites" strategy were classic examples of his refusal to engage with local issues which really mattered to the community he is supposed to represent. At the time he said that he did not get involved with local issues and that his job was to represent us in parliament. I wonder whether his stance would have been the same if a Conservative Council had tried to force through the same unpopular policies?
What has bragging about his power got to do with constituent confidentiality? Nothing whatsoever. If he has to show off how important he is to a couple of young ladies I personally find it rather sad and his attack on the erosion of confidentiality somewhat pathetic. After all, who asked him to tell us that he was at war with Rupert Murdoch? - no-one, he did it all by himself and only has himself to blame.
A simple mea culpa and resignation would have sufficed. Instead he shows his true ambiguous colours and will probably try to limp on. He was a bit of a busted flush after the student fees fiasco so it's only a matter of time
Alex
What utter tosh from Vince. As a local resident, I know something about this man who clearly got carried away by his own sense of self importance or vanity - probably both. After so many years in opposition, I suspect that his first sniff of power has gone to his head and he couldn't resist showing off to a pair of apparently impressionable young ladies. More fool him, hubris has brought down far better men than he. As a constituency MP, many of us feel that he did little or nothing to support our community against the LibDem Council who were determined to force through extremely unpopular policies - the Riverside sell-off and the "linked sites" strategy were classic examples of his refusal to engage with local issues which really mattered to the community he is supposed to represent. At the time he said that he did not get involved with local issues and that his job was to represent us in parliament. I wonder whether his stance would have been the same if a Conservative Council had tried to force through the same unpopular policies? What has bragging about his power got to do with constituent confidentiality? Nothing whatsoever. If he has to show off how important he is to a couple of young ladies I personally find it rather sad and his attack on the erosion of confidentiality somewhat pathetic. After all, who asked him to tell us that he was at war with Rupert Murdoch? - no-one, he did it all by himself and only has himself to blame. A simple mea culpa and resignation would have sufficed. Instead he shows his true ambiguous colours and will probably try to limp on. He was a bit of a busted flush after the student fees fiasco so it's only a matter of time Alex alex twickenham
  • Score: 0

5:05pm Thu 23 Dec 10

kalokagathia says...

The hypocrisy of this man is breathtaking:

"You do expect people to behave in a trustworthy way"

Is that right Vince? So what was your response last year when a disgruntled ex-Barclays employee sent you stolen and highly confidential documentation?

Recall that you decided the appropriate response was not to notify the bank and/or the police of the theft so that due legal process could be followed. Rather, you sent the documents straight to a major national newspaper (leading of course to the Guardian subsequently being slapped down by Mr Justice Blake for what was obviously a completely illegal disclosure of confidential information).

Can't have it both ways can you..?
The hypocrisy of this man is breathtaking: "You do expect people to behave in a trustworthy way" Is that right Vince? So what was your response last year when a disgruntled ex-Barclays employee sent you stolen and highly confidential documentation? Recall that you decided the appropriate response was not to notify the bank and/or the police of the theft so that due legal process could be followed. Rather, you sent the documents straight to a major national newspaper (leading of course to the Guardian subsequently being slapped down by Mr Justice Blake for what was obviously a completely illegal disclosure of confidential information). Can't have it both ways can you..? kalokagathia
  • Score: 0

5:22pm Thu 23 Dec 10

gcrozier says...

Good on you Vince.

It would be a real shame if MPs can't honestly discuss with their constituents the difficulties and dilemmas of working as a minister in a coalition government when you sometimes have to vote for things you do not support because they are part of a programme you support as a whole.

I am confident Vince is putting the right arguments inside government, on banking, on fair taxes, on a sensible immigration policy. Keep up the good work Vince!
Good on you Vince. It would be a real shame if MPs can't honestly discuss with their constituents the difficulties and dilemmas of working as a minister in a coalition government when you sometimes have to vote for things you do not support because they are part of a programme you support as a whole. I am confident Vince is putting the right arguments inside government, on banking, on fair taxes, on a sensible immigration policy. Keep up the good work Vince! gcrozier
  • Score: 0

10:41pm Thu 23 Dec 10

alex twickenham says...

I sometimes wonder why these people bother - GCrozier, a failed LibDem candidate and Tim underscore Lennon who, posts elsewhere, somewhat petulantly, about "ageist drivel". He recently castigated me for "banging on about Vince". Looks as though I was right doesn't it.? He goes on to say "I'd have more time for the anti-Vince whining if you talked about his record at Shell, and his seeming inability to take a position on the execution of Ken Saro-Wiwa. Instead, there's a tide of ageist drivel". What an extraordinary statement from a supporter - I suspect it needs closer scrutiny, which it will get.
GCrozier, a party apparatchik eulogises about Vince - "Keep up the good work Vince!" etc. Eugh!

I'm much more interested in "kalokagathia's" post - I suspect that a bit of serious sleuthing is in order - here it is again
"The hypocrisy of this man is breathtaking:
"You do expect people to behave in a trustworthy way"
Is that right Vince? So what was your response last year when a disgruntled ex-Barclays employee sent you stolen and highly confidential documentation?
Recall that you decided the appropriate response was not to notify the bank and/or the police of the theft so that due legal process could be followed. Rather, you sent the documents straight to a major national newspaper (leading of course to the Guardian subsequently being slapped down by Mr Justice Blake for what was obviously a completely illegal disclosure of confidential information).
Can't have it both ways can you..?"
Alex
PS: its good to see that the LibDem attack dogs are still on the prowl.
I sometimes wonder why these people bother - GCrozier, a failed LibDem candidate and Tim underscore Lennon who, posts elsewhere, somewhat petulantly, about "ageist drivel". He recently castigated me for "banging on about Vince". Looks as though I was right doesn't it.? He goes on to say "I'd have more time for the anti-Vince whining if you talked about his record at Shell, and his seeming inability to take a position on the execution of Ken Saro-Wiwa. Instead, there's a tide of ageist drivel". What an extraordinary statement from a supporter - I suspect it needs closer scrutiny, which it will get. GCrozier, a party apparatchik eulogises about Vince - "Keep up the good work Vince!" etc. Eugh! I'm much more interested in "kalokagathia's" post - I suspect that a bit of serious sleuthing is in order - here it is again "The hypocrisy of this man is breathtaking: "You do expect people to behave in a trustworthy way" Is that right Vince? So what was your response last year when a disgruntled ex-Barclays employee sent you stolen and highly confidential documentation? Recall that you decided the appropriate response was not to notify the bank and/or the police of the theft so that due legal process could be followed. Rather, you sent the documents straight to a major national newspaper (leading of course to the Guardian subsequently being slapped down by Mr Justice Blake for what was obviously a completely illegal disclosure of confidential information). Can't have it both ways can you..?" Alex PS: its good to see that the LibDem attack dogs are still on the prowl. alex twickenham
  • Score: 0

1:55am Fri 24 Dec 10

Deborah Thomas says...

Even as a former opponent of Vince, I am sympathetic to his arguments about the confidentiality of surgeries - I held a strict confidentiality basis for meetings with residents, unless they explicitly gave me permission to disclose their personal case details to third parties.

Nonetheless, the issue is not about his view of the coalition, which although titillating, are entirely his right to hold.

The issue is about his partiality as Secretary of State and whether his prejudices would hold him ultra vires if he acted on them, vis-a-vis the Sky deal.

That is clearly in the public interest, so by acting so foolishly, in saying one thing and doing another, he has committed a fatal error.

The fatality, however, is not the coalition, but his own Ministerial career.
Even as a former opponent of Vince, I am sympathetic to his arguments about the confidentiality of surgeries - I held a strict confidentiality basis for meetings with residents, unless they explicitly gave me permission to disclose their personal case details to third parties. Nonetheless, the issue is not about his view of the coalition, which although titillating, are entirely his right to hold. The issue is about his partiality as Secretary of State and whether his prejudices would hold him ultra vires if he acted on them, vis-a-vis the Sky deal. That is clearly in the public interest, so by acting so foolishly, in saying one thing and doing another, he has committed a fatal error. The fatality, however, is not the coalition, but his own Ministerial career. Deborah Thomas
  • Score: 0

10:46am Fri 24 Dec 10

tim_lennon says...

Woof, woof, Alex. Enjoying the anonymity of the internet? I'm very much looking forward to your further investigation on the late Mr. Saro-Wiwa, but can't say I'm holding my breath.

To be honest, these comment threads might be more used if you could offer something more than re-posting what others have said, don't you think?
Woof, woof, Alex. Enjoying the anonymity of the internet? I'm very much looking forward to your further investigation on the late Mr. Saro-Wiwa, but can't say I'm holding my breath. To be honest, these comment threads might be more used if you could offer something more than re-posting what others have said, don't you think? tim_lennon
  • Score: 0

8:43pm Fri 24 Dec 10

EdwinaWaugh says...

Vince prefers to shoot the messenger rather than admit any guilt. Typical of his party.
Vince prefers to shoot the messenger rather than admit any guilt. Typical of his party. EdwinaWaugh
  • Score: 0

6:57pm Sat 25 Dec 10

jsam says...

So what? A dubious sting, complete with lying journalists, discovers that a minister has to compromise his conscience to govern the country. Is this news to any grown-up? Dog bites man is not news. I, for one, am reassured. Think the last Labour government was any more united? Think the Tories feel any differently about the coalition? Not expressing their feelings makes them them hypocritical. And thank goodness we're mature enough to enjoy a coalition, not riven with difference as the Americans.

As for Sky, Vince, and most Liberals are biased against. Hunt, and most Conservatives, are biased for.
So what? A dubious sting, complete with lying journalists, discovers that a minister has to compromise his conscience to govern the country. Is this news to any grown-up? Dog bites man is not news. I, for one, am reassured. Think the last Labour government was any more united? Think the Tories feel any differently about the coalition? Not expressing their feelings makes them them hypocritical. And thank goodness we're mature enough to enjoy a coalition, not riven with difference as the Americans. As for Sky, Vince, and most Liberals are biased against. Hunt, and most Conservatives, are biased for. jsam
  • Score: 0

12:46am Sun 26 Dec 10

Scott Naylor says...

So since when has investigative journalism not been part of the media scene, and weren't there some other very famous cases discovered, like the Profumo Affair and Watergate, to mention a couple, which were down to independence of media to flush out the real issues?
So since when has investigative journalism not been part of the media scene, and weren't there some other very famous cases discovered, like the Profumo Affair and Watergate, to mention a couple, which were down to independence of media to flush out the real issues? Scott Naylor
  • Score: 0

2:53pm Sun 26 Dec 10

tim_lennon says...

Ah yes, 'Telegraph journalists in "Coalition Partners don't agree on everything" scoop.' Coming soon, the Daily Telegraph reveals exclusively that neither of coalition partners expects to deliver their entire manifesto.

Valuable stuff indeed, and definitely just as important as the Profumo Affair!
Ah yes, 'Telegraph journalists in "Coalition Partners don't agree on everything" scoop.' Coming soon, the Daily Telegraph reveals exclusively that neither of coalition partners expects to deliver their entire manifesto. Valuable stuff indeed, and definitely just as important as the Profumo Affair! tim_lennon
  • Score: 0

11:36pm Sun 26 Dec 10

alex twickenham says...

I'm with Mr Naylor on this one.
jsam refers to "lying journalists" - I'm going to go against the convention that two wrongs don't make a right and say that politicians only have themselves and their "aides" to blame for creating this atmosphere of distrust and suspicion which now pervades the political scene. As a result its vital that we have this sort of investigative journalism and I applaud those who have the courage to take on the party machines. It was dreadful in our green and leafy borough under Serge Lourie's LibDem rule - fortunately its now over, however any impartial readers might like to google ONCOM, our local and generously free information service and have a look at the columnists section. You will note that Serge is still smarting from his defeat since he has posted twice, both posts are pretty vitriolic condemnations of the new Tory administration which seems something of an abuse of the ethos which was to comment on community issues as do Guy Thomas, Jill Sanders and others who do so most eloquently and interestingly.
The Vince Cable story won't go away however much his party faithful huff and puff - there are far too many loose ends as they well know, which will be found and connected. Why prolong the agony? - you know he's a busted flush and will be shuffled out of sight as soon as its politically expedient to do so. I'm puzzled by his celebrity - he's hardly photogenic or charismatic and has a voice significantly more hard on the ear than Ed Milliband's. Why, oh why then does he seem so attracted to the camera lens and the microphone? Its quite bizarre but probably has a lot to do with hubris and repressed ego - no wonder he was such easy prey to a couple of young ladies who massaged his ego. Its a basic instinct and some men simply can't help puffing out their chests and making fools of themselves.
Alex
I'm with Mr Naylor on this one. jsam refers to "lying journalists" - I'm going to go against the convention that two wrongs don't make a right and say that politicians only have themselves and their "aides" to blame for creating this atmosphere of distrust and suspicion which now pervades the political scene. As a result its vital that we have this sort of investigative journalism and I applaud those who have the courage to take on the party machines. It was dreadful in our green and leafy borough under Serge Lourie's LibDem rule - fortunately its now over, however any impartial readers might like to google ONCOM, our local and generously free information service and have a look at the columnists section. You will note that Serge is still smarting from his defeat since he has posted twice, both posts are pretty vitriolic condemnations of the new Tory administration which seems something of an abuse of the ethos which was to comment on community issues as do Guy Thomas, Jill Sanders and others who do so most eloquently and interestingly. The Vince Cable story won't go away however much his party faithful huff and puff - there are far too many loose ends as they well know, which will be found and connected. Why prolong the agony? - you know he's a busted flush and will be shuffled out of sight as soon as its politically expedient to do so. I'm puzzled by his celebrity - he's hardly photogenic or charismatic and has a voice significantly more hard on the ear than Ed Milliband's. Why, oh why then does he seem so attracted to the camera lens and the microphone? Its quite bizarre but probably has a lot to do with hubris and repressed ego - no wonder he was such easy prey to a couple of young ladies who massaged his ego. Its a basic instinct and some men simply can't help puffing out their chests and making fools of themselves. Alex alex twickenham
  • Score: 0

3:33pm Mon 27 Dec 10

Scott Naylor says...

Deborah Thomas writes " I am sympathetic to his arguments about the confidentiality of surgeries - I held a strict confidentiality basis for meetings with residents, unless they explicitly gave me permission to disclose their personal case details to third parties."

In this case, there has been no exposure of confidential information about residents, the ladies set a well-planned trap, none of what has been mentioned has been about anything of a personal nature as they were fictional, and despite the 'confidential' claim, if there are issues which are of national importance, then as in this case, they are reported about their MP; albeit they were not reported completely, were they, only part of it was reported, and then because the news was not in the Telegraph's favour, but gladly someone else in the paper decided to leak it to the BBC in the public’s best interest. So a bit of rough justice for some clever journalistic work, half a back-fire as that would have effectively been manipulation!

What about the Lib Dem who tried worming his way into the Richmond Conservative's office during the election run-up, where all amounts of sensitive information was being held, not least the voter records? Didn't hear too much about that in the National Press, a Kramer Lib Dem member who was rustled at the last minute due to a couple of Conservative members remembering who this character was on e-mail!

If this whole issue had been about tactics, and not commercial issues, that may have been passed as party politics, but the worst crime was not only that but stating that he could bring the coalition down, which appears to be putting personal ego and what is diametrically opposite to his own party's meeting outcome before agreeing to the coalition, and he appears to be swathing around the 'power' kick far too much. If I had private thoughts, I certainly would have kept them private, or only shared them with trusted colleagues. Why would I tell people I had never met before. Is it possible there is another theory, that Cable wanted the outside world to know his own true thoughts, as the confidentiality is to protect the supposed residents, not him, this wasn't a behind closed doors party political meeting was it?

We know that Cable has positioned himself quite cleverly; by resigning as the Deputy Leader of the party, he gave way to Simon Hughes, a trusted left-winger himself, whom he also knew would do the work of playing Mr Nasty Guy Mr Nice Guy, as Simon did a few weeks ago, when threatening similarly from the outside, the membership side, so Vince could be seen to be keeping his nose clean.

However clearly there was a strategy along these lines, as Cable and his colleagues have been pressing for AV, measure which falls very short of PR, yet again an unrepresentative step, but is this perhaps his only real area of interest, and some could say 'job done' as the legislation is now in place for the May elections, so is this Mr wooden and not so smiley right-footed-toes about to hang up his dancing shoes once and for all, now he has been found not to be so agile or light-footed with either politics or ball-room dancing as originally self-suggested?

By the way, do you think the floppy black hats suggest something ominous, do they hide his self-confessed lack of ability to smile or not look serious? Practice in front of the mirror learning smiling may help, but oh maybe you need to that that as you do that already in front of Telegraph’s pretty lady reporters?
Deborah Thomas writes " I am sympathetic to his arguments about the confidentiality of surgeries - I held a strict confidentiality basis for meetings with residents, unless they explicitly gave me permission to disclose their personal case details to third parties." In this case, there has been no exposure of confidential information about residents, the ladies set a well-planned trap, none of what has been mentioned has been about anything of a personal nature as they were fictional, and despite the 'confidential' claim, if there are issues which are of national importance, then as in this case, they are reported about their MP; albeit they were not reported completely, were they, only part of it was reported, and then because the news was not in the Telegraph's favour, but gladly someone else in the paper decided to leak it to the BBC in the public’s best interest. So a bit of rough justice for some clever journalistic work, half a back-fire as that would have effectively been manipulation! What about the Lib Dem who tried worming his way into the Richmond Conservative's office during the election run-up, where all amounts of sensitive information was being held, not least the voter records? Didn't hear too much about that in the National Press, a Kramer Lib Dem member who was rustled at the last minute due to a couple of Conservative members remembering who this character was on e-mail! If this whole issue had been about tactics, and not commercial issues, that may have been passed as party politics, but the worst crime was not only that but stating that he could bring the coalition down, which appears to be putting personal ego and what is diametrically opposite to his own party's meeting outcome before agreeing to the coalition, and he appears to be swathing around the 'power' kick far too much. If I had private thoughts, I certainly would have kept them private, or only shared them with trusted colleagues. Why would I tell people I had never met before. Is it possible there is another theory, that Cable wanted the outside world to know his own true thoughts, as the confidentiality is to protect the supposed residents, not him, this wasn't a behind closed doors party political meeting was it? We know that Cable has positioned himself quite cleverly; by resigning as the Deputy Leader of the party, he gave way to Simon Hughes, a trusted left-winger himself, whom he also knew would do the work of playing Mr Nasty Guy Mr Nice Guy, as Simon did a few weeks ago, when threatening similarly from the outside, the membership side, so Vince could be seen to be keeping his nose clean. However clearly there was a strategy along these lines, as Cable and his colleagues have been pressing for AV, measure which falls very short of PR, yet again an unrepresentative step, but is this perhaps his only real area of interest, and some could say 'job done' as the legislation is now in place for the May elections, so is this Mr wooden and not so smiley right-footed-toes about to hang up his dancing shoes once and for all, now he has been found not to be so agile or light-footed with either politics or ball-room dancing as originally self-suggested? By the way, do you think the floppy black hats suggest something ominous, do they hide his self-confessed lack of ability to smile or not look serious? Practice in front of the mirror learning smiling may help, but oh maybe you need to that that as you do that already in front of Telegraph’s pretty lady reporters? Scott Naylor
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree